20161111

VETERAN'S DAY COCKTAILS


For all our troops, past and present, Thank you for your service and sacrifice while defending our freedoms and way of life.

The Mottoes of the branches of the United States Military:
United States Army: "This We'll Defend"
United States Coast Guard: "Semper Paratus"
United States Navy: "Honor, Courage, Commitment."
United States Marine Corps: "Semper Fidelis"
United States Air Force:"Aim High...Fly, Fight, Win"


VETERANS DAY
COCKTAILS

ARMY NAVY COCKTAIL
AVIATION
JUNGLE JUICE
NAVY GROG
RED, WHITE & B'LURE MARTINI
STAR SPANGLED COCKTAIL
TRIPLE RUM PUNCH
U. S. MARINE CORPS MARTINI

Did you know that Happy Hour has its roots in military history?

There is actually something called the Coast Guard Cocktail, however this is not a drink but a nickname for sea sickness.

ABOUT VETERANS DAY

According to The U.S. Department of Veteran's Affairs:
"World War I – known at the time as “The Great War” - officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of “the war to end all wars.”"

This is why we celebrate Veteran's Day every November 11th. Originally known as Armistice Day, November 11th was officially made a holiday on May 13, 1938, dedicated to world peace and to honor the soldiers of World War I. However, in 1954, after the sacrifice of troops during WWII and Korea, Congress changed "Armistice" to "Veterans" and November 11th became a day to honor American Veterans of all wars.

If there is some confusion as to what day Veteran's Day is celebrated make no mistake, according to the Department of Veteran's Affairs it is always November 11th:
"The Uniform Holiday Bill (Public Law 90-363 (82 Stat. 250)) was signed on June 28, 1968, and was intended to ensure three-day weekends for Federal employees by celebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Columbus Day. It was thought that these extended weekends would encourage travel, recreational and cultural activities and stimulate greater industrial and commercial production. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holidays on their original dates.

The first Veterans Day under the new law was observed with much confusion on October 25, 1971. It was quite apparent that the commemoration of this day was a matter of historic and patriotic significance to a great number of our citizens, and so on September 20th, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford signed Public Law 94-97 (89 Stat. 479), which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of November 11, beginning in 1978. This action supported the desires of the overwhelming majority of state legislatures, all major veterans service organizations and the American people.

Veterans Day continues to be observed on November 11, regardless of what day of the week on which it falls. The restoration of the observance of Veterans Day to November 11 not only preserves the historical significance of the date, but helps focus attention on the important purpose of Veterans Day: A celebration to honor America's veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacrifice for the common good."

*It is interesting to note that our allies, Canada and Australia, also observe November 11th as a Remembrance Day for their troops.


As to why the poppy is associated with Veteran's Day, this poem by John McCrae should tell the story:

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders Fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders Fields.
~ John McCrae 1915


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